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Motorcycle Crash Statistics in Utah

Written by 
Published in Motorcycle Safety

Congratulation to Joe Slaon for winning the Utah Highway Safety Office's "Drive Aware.  Ride Aware" motorcycle safety video contest.  Joe wan $1,000 for his four-hour effort.  If you page down on the HSO facebook page you can find the motorcycle safety awareness video. Joe looks like a new driver but he has some sage words of advice and references statistics to bolster his point.  He says that one out of nine highway fatalities are those riding a motorcycle and that number is rising.  Here are some other interesting statistics:

  • Motorcycle crashes most often occur in Utah between 4 and 6 p.m.
  • Most motorcycle crashes in Utah occur on Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
  • Motorcycle riders ages 20 to 24 are most involved in motorcycle crashes in Utah.
  • Most motorcycle crashes in Utah occur between 30 to 39 mph.
  • The number of motorcycle crashes in Utah per miles travel are increasing.
  • The number of motorcycle deaths in Utah per miles travelled are static.
  • The number of crashes per registered motorcycles in Utah are dropping.

Motorcycle crash statistics in Utah

  • The number of motorcycle deaths per registered motorcycles in Utah are dropping.
  • Of all vehicle crashes in Utah motorcycle crashes are increasing and account for about 12% of all crashes.
  • Most motorcycle crashes in Utah occur in Salt Lake County, followed by Utah, Weber and Davis counties.
  • If you are in a motorcycle crash in Utah you are 2.4% likely to be killed.
  • If you are in a motorcycle crash in Utah you are 7 times more likely to be killed than in a car crash.
  • Males are involved in about 83% of motorcycle crashes in Utah.
  • About half of those involved in a motorcycle crash in Utah were wearing helmets.
  • Most motorcycle crashes in Utah involve collision with another vehicle.
  • When motorcycle crashes in Utah involve another vehicle the other vehicle most likely failed to yield the right of way.
  • When the motorcyclist is at fault most often they performed an improper lane change or were following too close.
We all need to be careful out there - put down the cell phones - look twice - and please watch out for motorcycles!